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Creating a lifetime of change

Our Work: A Future all children deserve

Half of all mental health conditions have started by age 14*

Yet children under this age historically had limited access to mental health services in Australia.

KidsXpress exists to ensure that children are getting the help they need, in the way they need it and when they need it.

Childhood mental health issues often arise from experiences of trauma and a stressful home environment. Our trauma-informed Expressive Therapy and Education services combine psychology and the creative process to support primary school-age children and their caregivers.

(*Kessler, R.C., et al., Lifetime prevalence and age-of onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders 2005).

See the signs. Heal the hurt.

Half of all mental health conditions emerge before age 14*, yet signs of a struggling child often go unnoticed. It can sometimes be challenging to distinguish between typical childhood behaviours and signs of underlying mental health concerns. While children naturally go through various emotional and behavioural changes as they grow, there are some signs that suggest there may be a need for closer attention. Early action is key to prevent issues growing with a child into adulthood. Our resource guide is a great starting point.

(*Kessler, R.C., et al., Lifetime prevalence and age-of onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders 2005).

Download Free Guide

Our Annual Impact

Mental ill-health affects 1-in-7 Australian children, yet fewer than 25% are accessing care.

Without support, the impact of their condition can grow with them into lifelong challenges. We’re on a mission to change that.

  • 2,577

    students were reached by us in 2023 through our School Partnership Program.

  • 183

    teachers were supported through our School Partnership Program in 2023.

  • 91.7%

    of children who attended KidsXpress identified positive change in themselves.

    (CORS, 2023 Term 2)

  • $1 : $2.76

    is our cost benefit ratio, meaning that for every $1 invested in KidsXpress a return of $2.76 is generated in social value.

    (DAE, 2015, p.46)

KidsXpress is like a hospital for birds with injured wings. You leave when you can fly again.

10-year-old girl, former client

You didn’t just help my child but my whole family. You were our safe harbour during a period of storm.

Mother of former client

My son is still in my life today because of KidsXpress.

Mother of former client

We’d been screaming out, ‘what else can we do for our students?’ and this is it. This partnership with KidsXpress.

BPS Principal

KidsXpress isn’t a program. It’s a relationship that we build together based on the needs of our students.

HPPS Principal
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Ava and the Drums

Ava and the Drums

During one session, 8 year old Ava* who’d been referred to our Macquarie Park centre, was invited to choose an instrument to play. She gravitated toward the drums, and as she began to play, her movements were loud, erratic and forceful.

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Emily's Story

Emily's Story

At just ten years old, Emily* faced a distressing situation, common to many schoolchildren but one that none should have to endure

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Media Release

Media Release

KidsXpress calls for more government support to increase access to mental health services for children aged 12 and under.

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High School Transition

High School Transition

Moving to high school is one of the key milestones of a child’s life. In Term 3 of 2023 we conducted a survey for Year 6 students for the purpose of understanding their thoughts and emotions about this transition.

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Our work in the Snowy Valleys, NSW

Our work in the Snowy Valleys, NSW

In the aftermath of the Black Summer bushfires of 2019/20, KidsXpress swiftly moved into action to deliver a tailored trauma-focused program for the purpose of community rebuilding and socio-emotional rehabilitation.

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Manny’s Story

Manny’s Story

When Manny was 6 years old his father was incarcerated on drug charges. The two years that followed weren’t easy; his mother sometimes struggled to cope with the demands of parenting four children alone.

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@kidsxpressmentalhealth
We often place significant emphasis on a child's IQ celebrating academic achievements and cognitive prowess. However, there's another crucial aspect of development that deserves equal, if not more, attention: Emotional Intelligence (EQ).  EQ, refers to the ability to recognise, understand, and manage our own emotions, as well as those of others. It encompasses skills such as emotional awareness, self-regulation, empathy, and social skills. High EQ is linked to better relationships, improved mental health, and success in various life domains.  Signs Your Child Has High EQ:
1.	Empathy: Your child shows a deep understanding of others' feelings and can relate to them. They might offer comfort to friends who are upset or demonstrate compassion in challenging situations.
2.	Self-Awareness: They are in tune with their own emotions, can name what they are feeling, and understand how these emotions affect their behaviour.
3.	Self-Regulation: Your child can manage their emotions effectively, demonstrating patience and control, even in frustrating or stressful situations.
4.	Social Skills: They build strong, healthy relationships with peers and adults, communicate effectively, and navigate social complexities with ease.
5.	Motivation: They are driven by internal goals rather than external rewards, showing perseverance and a positive attitude towards challenges.
While IQ is often associated with academic and professional success, EQ is equally, if not more, vital for overall well-being and happiness. Children with high EQ are better equipped to handle stress, resolve conflicts, and build meaningful relationships. These skills are crucial for navigating life's ups and downs and achieving long-term success and satisfaction.  #EmotionalIntelligence #ChildDevelopment #MentalHealth #EQvsIQ #ParentingTips #KidsXpress
#SelfCareSunday
As parents, we often want our children to learn manners and the importance of saying “sorry” when they’ve done something wrong. However, forcing a child to apologise may sometimes have unintended consequences on their mental and emotional development.  Why Forced Apologies May Be Harmful:  Lack of Genuine Understanding: When children are compelled to apologise, they might not truly understand why their behaviour was wrong. This can prevent them from learning the deeper lessons of empathy and responsibility  Resentment and Shame: A forced apology can lead to feelings of resentment and shame, rather than fostering genuine remorse and a desire to make amends.  Miscommunication: Compelling an apology can communicate that words are more important than actions. This may lead children to believe that simply saying “sorry” is enough, without taking steps to correct their behaviour or make amends.  Positive Alternatives:  Model Apologies: Show children how to apologise sincerely by modeling the behaviour yourself. When you make a mistake, apologise and explain what you’ll do differently next time.  Encourage Empathy: Help your child understand the impact of their actions on others. Ask questions like, “How do you think your friend felt when you did that?”  Problem-Solving: Guide your child in finding ways to make amends and improve their behaviour. This fosters a sense of responsibility and empathy.  The goal is to help children develop a genuine understanding of their actions and their impact on others, leading to heartfelt apologies and meaningful change.  #ChildDevelopment #ParentingTips #MentalHealth #Empathy #PositiveParenting
In today's world, parents often have no choice but to work full-time and juggle numerous commitments. This shift has led children to seek guidance and emotional support from their peers rather than adults. Child development expert Dr. Gabor Mate highlights that this peer attachment can be unhealthy, as peers lack the stability and wisdom adults provide. As a result, children may face increased anxiety, behavioral issues, and struggles with secure relationships. Understanding and addressing this shift is crucial for fostering healthy emotional growth in children.  #attachmentparenting #parentingtips #childdevelopment #childmentalhealth #anxiety
Renowned physician and addiction expert, Dr. Gabor Maté emphasises the significant impact of emotional repression on physical health, particularly in relation to autoimmune diseases. He explains that when we consistently suppress our emotions—especially negative ones like anger—we trigger a stress response in our bodies. This stress response can disrupt the balance of our nervous, hormonal, and immune systems, potentially leading to chronic illnesses such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune disorders.  Maté highlights that these emotional coping mechanisms often develop in early childhood as survival strategies in response to stressful environments. Over time, these repressive behaviours become ingrained in our personalities, which can be harmful to our health. For instance, individuals who tend to people-please, avoid conflict, or suppress their anger may appear calm and composed, but internally they are under significant stress, which undermines their immune system and overall health.  Studies support Maté's views, showing that people who repress their emotions are more likely to develop chronic illnesses. For example, research has found a higher incidence of cancer among those who suppress their anger and emotional stress. Additionally, chronic stress from unprocessed emotions has been linked to various autoimmune conditions, as it continuously strains the body's physiological systems.  By understanding and addressing these emotional patterns, we can potentially improve our health outcomes. This involves acknowledging and expressing emotions healthily rather than repressing them, thereby reducing the harmful stress that can lead to disease.  #selfcaresunday #emotionalhealth #autoimmunediseases #mentalhealth
In today’s world parents, globally, often have no choice but to work full-time and juggle multiple numerous commitments. Renowned trauma expert Dr Gabor Mate suggests in this audio clip that this shift has led children to seek guidance and emotional support from their peers rather than adults. This can be unhealthy as peers lack the stability and objectivity than a parent or other adult caregiver can provide. As a result, children may face increases anxiety, behavioural issues and struggles with secure attachments. Understanding and assessing this shift is crucial for fostering healthy and emotional growth in children.  #attachmentparenting #childmentalhealth #parentingtips #anxiety